Marmoset Health Concerns: Human Disease, Cold Sores & More


Callitrichids kept as pets ought to go in for annual checkups and have their stools cultured. Protozoa, such as Giardia, should be looked for in feces during a diagnostic test. Tests on the blood might be necessary. Marmosets and tamarins should not be kept in close proximity to humans who are ill with viral infections, as even the common cold has the potential to be fatal for a callitrichid. Diseases that are typically associated with children, such as measles, chicken pox, and mumps, are also capable of taking the lives of young monkeys. It is important to vaccinate a monkey against measles and tetanus before it is allowed to be around children.
Cold sores, which are caused by the Herpes virus, are extremely hazardous to marmosets and tamarins, and they have the potential to lead to a fatal case of encephalitis. It is not ethical for people who have HIV or any other disease that suppresses the immune system to own primates.
The intradermal skin test is able to detect tuberculosis in callitrichids, despite the fact that this infectious disease is uncommon in New World primates. The good news is that Old World species, including macaques, green monkeys, and rhesus monkeys, are home to the majority of the world’s most dangerous viral zoonotic diseases.
The most common medical issue is diarrhea, which can be caused by a number of different things, including changes in diet, stress, parasites, and bacterial infections such as those caused by E. coli, Salmonella, Shigella, Klebsiella, and Campylobacter. Diarrhea is the most common medical problem. Pepto-bismol (.2 cc PO QID) or kaopectate (.25 cc PO QID) might be of some assistance. Carafate has been shown to be an effective treatment for diarrhea that does not respond to other medications. It is possible for diarrhea to become a serious condition, even one that threatens life. Marmosets and tamarins will consume oral Keflex pediatric oral suspension as well as Amoxidrops, both of which have a pleasant taste. Either the jugular vein or the femoral vein can be manually compressed in order to extract blood from the patient. It is possible to insert catheters into either of these veins as well.
Wasting Syndrome is a particularly infuriating issue that can arise with callitrichids. At this time, it is believed that the pancreatic worm known as Trichospirura leptostoma is to blame for this condition. Cockroaches serve as an intermediate host for the worm that causes this disease. Many marmosets that were caught in the wild will have an infestation of between two and three worms in their pancreas; however, these worms may multiply to a point where they are fatal in captivity. In order to stop the reproduction of these worms, stringent hygiene practices and effective insect management are essential. These symptoms are caused by a dysfunction in the pancreas, which in turn leads to diarrhea, poor absorption of nutrients, and malnutrition. It’s possible that persistent diarrhea, weight loss, balding at the base of the tail, and paralysis in the hind legs could eventually lead to death. Eggs may be found in the feces of experimentally infested marmosets for a short period of time after the worms have finished laying them, but after that, it is extremely rare, if not impossible, to find eggs in the feces of these animals. Even though fecal parasite examinations are of the utmost importance in any case of diarrhea or weight loss, fenbendazole should be given if a veterinarian has a suspicion that their patient has pancreatic worms. This medication should be taken orally once per day for a total of 14 days at a dosage of 50 mg/kg. On the other hand, if there is significant damage to the pancreas, supportive care, such as the administration of supplemental pancreatic enzymes with each meal, is required. Even though marmosets are more likely to be infected with this worm, tamarins aren’t immune to it either.
Lymphochorionmeningitis and encephalomyocarditis are two viruses that are of significant importance in callitrichids. The rat and the mouse are the host reservoirs for the LCM virus, which results in anemia and hepatitis in monkeys that are infected with it. It is possible to find LCM in callitrichids that have been kept in urban environments, such as apartment buildings or other places where mice and rats are common. The transmission happens through the aerosol route. It is possible that encephalomyocarditis occurs most frequently in zoos. Rats and mice are also thought to be potential hosts for this disease. There is also a possibility of contracting callitrichid hepatitis, a third virus.
There have been isolated cases of toxoplasmosis in callitrichids. Both marmosets and tamarins can become infected with spirurid nematodes and thorny-headed worms, which are transmitted by cockroaches and coporaphagous beetles respectively.
In addition, tamarins and marmosets that are kept in apartments or houses that have been painted with lead-based paint run the risk of developing lead poisoning.
Bites from callitrichids should always be treated as potentially serious injuries. Povidone iodine should be used to scrub wounds, and then hydrogen peroxide should be applied. Owners who have been bitten by their pets should be encouraged to seek medical attention from a qualified professional.

Callitrichids kept as pets ought to go in for annual checkups and have their stools cultured. Protozoa, such as Giardia, should be looked for in feces during a diagnostic test. Tests on the blood might be necessary. Marmosets and tamarins should not be kept in close proximity to humans who are ill with viral infections, as even the common cold has the potential to be fatal for a callitrichid. Diseases that are typically associated with children, such as measles, chicken pox, and mumps, are also capable of taking the lives of young monkeys. It is important to vaccinate a monkey against measles and tetanus before it is allowed to be around children.
Cold sores, which are caused by the Herpes virus, are extremely hazardous to marmosets and tamarins, and they have the potential to lead to a fatal case of encephalitis. It is not ethical for people who have HIV or any other disease that suppresses the immune system to own primates.
The intradermal skin test is able to detect tuberculosis in callitrichids, despite the fact that this infectious disease is uncommon in New World primates. The good news is that Old World species, including macaques, green monkeys, and rhesus monkeys, are home to the majority of the world’s most dangerous viral zoonotic diseases.
The most common medical issue is diarrhea, which can be caused by a number of different things, including changes in diet, stress, parasites, and bacterial infections such as those caused by E. coli, Salmonella, Shigella, Klebsiella, and Campylobacter. Diarrhea is the most common medical problem. Pepto-bismol (.2 cc PO QID) or kaopectate (.25 cc PO QID) might be of some assistance. Carafate has been shown to be an effective treatment for diarrhea that does not respond to other medications. It is possible for diarrhea to become a serious condition, even one that threatens life. Marmosets and tamarins will consume oral Keflex pediatric oral suspension as well as Amoxidrops, both of which have a pleasant taste. Either the jugular vein or the femoral vein can be manually compressed in order to extract blood from the patient. It is possible to insert catheters into either of these veins as well.
Wasting Syndrome is a particularly infuriating issue that can arise with callitrichids. At this time, it is believed that the pancreatic worm known as Trichospirura leptostoma is to blame for this condition. Cockroaches serve as an intermediate host for the worm that causes this disease. Many marmosets that were caught in the wild will have an infestation of between two and three worms in their pancreas; however, these worms may multiply to a point where they are fatal in captivity. In order to stop the reproduction of these worms, stringent hygiene practices and effective insect management are essential. These symptoms are caused by a dysfunction in the pancreas, which in turn leads to diarrhea, poor absorption of nutrients, and malnutrition. It’s possible that persistent diarrhea, weight loss, balding at the base of the tail, and paralysis in the hind legs could eventually lead to death. Eggs may be found in the feces of experimentally infested marmosets for a short period of time after the worms have finished laying them, but after that, it is extremely rare, if not impossible, to find eggs in the feces of these animals. Even though fecal parasite examinations are of the utmost importance in any case of diarrhea or weight loss, fenbendazole should be given if a veterinarian has a suspicion that their patient has pancreatic worms. This medication should be taken orally once per day for a total of 14 days at a dosage of 50 mg/kg. On the other hand, if there is significant damage to the pancreas, supportive care, such as the administration of supplemental pancreatic enzymes with each meal, is required. Even though marmosets are more likely to be infected with this worm, tamarins aren’t immune to it either.
Lymphochorionmeningitis and encephalomyocarditis are two viruses that are of significant importance in callitrichids. The rat and the mouse are the host reservoirs for the LCM virus, which results in anemia and hepatitis in monkeys that are infected with it. It is possible to find LCM in callitrichids that have been kept in urban environments, such as apartment buildings or other places where mice and rats are common. The transmission happens through the aerosol route. It is possible that encephalomyocarditis occurs most frequently in zoos. Rats and mice are also thought to be potential hosts for this disease. There is also a possibility of contracting callitrichid hepatitis, a third virus.
There have been isolated cases of toxoplasmosis in callitrichids. Both marmosets and tamarins can become infected with spirurid nematodes and thorny-headed worms, which are transmitted by cockroaches and coporaphagous beetles respectively.
In addition, tamarins and marmosets that are kept in apartments or houses that have been painted with lead-based paint run the risk of developing lead poisoning.
Bites from callitrichids should always be treated as potentially serious injuries. Povidone iodine should be used to scrub wounds, and then hydrogen peroxide should be applied. Owners who have been bitten by their pets should be encouraged to seek medical attention from a qualified professional.

   😍 These are must-have items such as small animal cages, cage accessory and food for Finger Monkey pet owners, maybe you need them too? Click images & check them out!

 🥰 This large double unit cage has three ramps, ramp covers, and two resting shelves. It is easier to clean the cage interior with removable base pans and double doors. Click the link to see different story options for your pet.

🥰 For the finger monkey diet, you can feed them these fresh unsalted cashews. As much as I enjoy these good-quality cashews, my finger monkey pet does too. Check out if your pet will like it too.

🥰 These cage accessories go with the large double unit cage! They are shelf, pan and ramp covers that are easily removable and washable in the machine. Click the link to check their color options.

 🥰 This dried sweet tamarind is convenient as it comes without the shell and seed. It is also natural and fresh! Check out the reviews to see if you want to feed your finger monkey this fruit rich in magnesium and calcium.

 🥰 This small animal playpen is perfect for your finger monkey pet to be closer to nature. It has space to put treats, litter box and more. Click to see the video.

 

🥰 This Maize Flakes Cereal is organic and healthy with ingredients from sprouted oatmeal, which is high in protein. This is perfect for your finger monkey’s diet! Click the link to see other cereal options.

Recent Posts